Tag Archives: online

Just Google It: How Google Has Changed Research for Grad Students [INFOGRAPHIC]


Google It
Source: GradSchoolHub.com

Cite this article:
Silva E (2014-01-29 09:56:24). Just Google It: How Google Has Changed Research for Grad Students [INFOGRAPHIC]. Enzo Silva blog. Retrieved: Apr 19, 2014, from http://enzosilva.com/blog/2014/01/29/just-google-it-how-google-has-changed-research-for-grad-students-infographic/

MOOC – What Is It?


I’m not going to reinvent the wheel and explain what a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) is. Tons of people are trying to explain this “new” trend.

While I think most of the craze around MOOCs is the fact that some big institutions are offering interactive versions of their courses with recorded slides and video lectures, the what makes a MOOC engaging is what makes any sort of eLearning or Learning without the “e” engaging: clear objectives, connectedness, knowledge/skill transfer optimization, fun (why not?), scaffolding… all those words you threw around in grad school.

So, whether you’re designing a MOOC or any type of learning experience, forget the term, design it thinking of your audience and objectives that will help them acquire skills and knowledge they can actually USE.

The technology is an enabler, not a driver.

 

What is a MOOC?

The MOOC Guide

Massive Open Online Course (Wikipedia)

MOOC Guide (Wikispaces)

MOOC.ca Providers List

Massive Open Online Course (references from Educause)

MOOC Advisor (blog and resources about MOOCs)

 


To learn more about how to design a MOOC the most effectively, consider earning an instructional technology masters degree.

 

Cite this article:
Silva E (2013-09-27 11:57:28). MOOC - What Is It?. Enzo Silva blog. Retrieved: Apr 19, 2014, from http://enzosilva.com/blog/2013/09/27/mooc-what-is-it/

Trends in Educational Technology (eLearning Trends INFOGRAPHIC)


I know, too many buzzwords flying around. So, how do you keep up with all the terminology and make sure you’re not missing out on trends that *might* have a positive impact in your learning programs or personal learning experiences? Answer: keep up with resources such as this cheat sheet for Educational Technology Trends compiled by the people at Boundless in infographic form:

 

Educational Technology Trends Cheat Sheet

Learn about some of the latest trends in eLearning, in one infographic by @GoBoundless

Source article from LearnDash.

Cite this article:
Silva E (2013-08-07 10:52:03). Trends in Educational Technology (eLearning Trends INFOGRAPHIC). Enzo Silva blog. Retrieved: Apr 19, 2014, from http://enzosilva.com/blog/2013/08/07/trends-in-educational-technology-elearning-trends-infographic/

Duolingo – Free Language Learning Curricula (Available on Web, iOS and Android)


I can’t begin to stress how learning languages opened my life to new opportunities, coming from the countryside of Brazil
There are several ways to learn a language for free online: Skype meetups, virtual worlds, video chats, chatrooms (I used to go to my sister’s house to get on ICQ chatrooms to practice English on her computer), applications, open curricula, and so forth… many of these discussed previously on this blog.

Duolingo is especially interesting because:

  • It helps translate the Web (in partnership with Google)
  • It contains gamification elements (rewards and levels are linked to how well you perform in the application)
  • The curricula are instructionally sound and well-designed
  • It is offered on the Web, for iOS, and for Android platforms
  • It is FREE for life (especially in light of major online language learning services like LiveMocha now charging for their services)

Duolingo currently (June 2013) offers courses in:

  • Spanish
  • English
  • French
  • German
  • Portuguese
  • Italian

Look for Duolingo on your app store and download it for free.

Pick a language and start learning!

 

Duolingo on the go

Now on iPhone and Android.

Email a link to my device

Email a link to my device

Cite this article:
Silva E (2013-05-31 11:37:44). Duolingo - Free Language Learning Curricula (Available on Web, iOS and Android). Enzo Silva blog. Retrieved: Apr 19, 2014, from http://enzosilva.com/blog/2013/05/31/duolingo-free-language-learning-curricula-available-on-web-ios-and-android/

Free Full Online Courses by Stanford University – Spring 2012


Several universities world-wide have made their courseware available in different formats over the years. A very popular format is that of podcasts on iTunesU or video lectures on Youtube. See, for instance, this broad list of “free courseware” offerings by major universities. Yale, for example, has made several past lectures available on their Open Yale website. The Open University lets students try course materials for free on their OpenLearn resources page, which. Often, these courses are nothing but pre-recorded videos and audio elements (not full interactive courses) made public by the universities as a form of community outreach (which is already great, don’t get me wrong).

However, Stanford University is blazing trails for open online courseware. Anyone (as long as they understand the recommended prerequisites)can sign up to take some of their courses online, free of charge in the Spring semester of 2012. The courses will consist of live lectures (which can also be see later in an archive), quizzes, and forums in which online students can ask questions.

The current Spring 2012 semester offerings include courses on an eclectic variety subjects ranging from Computer Science to Game Theory, from Anatomy to Linguistics:

Computer Science 101
by Nick Parlante

http://cs101-class.org

Software Engineering for Software as a Service (SAAS)
by Armando Fox and David Patterson

http://saas-class.org/

Game Theory
by Matthew O. Jackson and Yoav Shoham

http://game-theory-class.org

Natural Language processing
by Dan Jurafsky and Christopher Manning

http://nlp-class.org

Probabilistic Graphical Models
by Daphne Koller

http://pgm-class.org/

Human-Computer interfaces
by Scott Klemmer

http://hci-class.org/

Machine Learning
by Andrew Ng

http://jan2012.ml-class.org/

Technology Entrepreneurship
by Chuck Eesley

http://entrepreneur-class.org/

The Lean Launchpad
by Steve Blank

http://launchpad-class.org/

Cryptography
by Professor Dan Boneh

http://crypto-class.org/

Information Theory
by Tsachy (Itschak) Weissman

http://infotheory-class.org/

Anatomy
by Dr. Sakti Sirivastava

http://anatomy-class.org/

Design and Analysis of Algorithms I
by Tim Roughgarden

http://algo-class.org/

Making Green Buildings
by Professor Martin Fischer

http://greenbuilding-class.org/

 

””

 

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List adapted from The Rohan Aurora blog.

5 Free Online Visual Dictionary and Thesaurus Applications


Sometimes, when I need some inspiration and ideas for words to use in a project, I take the visual route and consult a “visual thesaurus”.

These handy Web applications can help you quickly find new words for a concept you’re working with, visualize its relationship with other words, and, of course, amplify your vocabulary and aid you in avoiding repetition, replication, redundancy, and echolalia, et &…

Here are a few online visual thesaurus applications that are free to use:

SnappyWords -Soon to have its open source code available for the public, SnappyWords can came in handy when you want to share a word’s connections with others: each entry has a unique search entry URL that takes users straight to its visual “network map”. This service also provides a built-in hover-over dictionary (when you hover over each word’s node, of course).

VisuWords -Very similar to SnappyWords, this application doesn’t seem to allow direct linking to specific words. Built-in dictionary.

WordVis - This simple visual thesaurus lets you filter words by different parts of speech and categories. Once again, no direct hyperlinking to specific words is provided. Built-in dictionary.

 

GraphWords – This visual thesaurus has handy (am I using the word “handy” too often in this post?), I meant “commodious” social media sharing buttons for quickly sharing your word maps with friends on Facebook and Twitter. Unlike the previous services on this list, GraphWords has a drawback: no built-in dictionary is provided.

Merriam-Webster’s Visual Dictionary – This is a typical illustrated dictionary. Illustrations are available in different categories. The search mechanism (custom Google search) isn’t very effective, but the illustration work is quite comprehensive.

 

 

Record Screencasts and Demos with no Downloads


It is nice not to have to download any programs if you want to record simple screencasts and demos (and in SIMPLE steps) of your computer screen.

Here is an good review of ScreenToaster by Jane Hart.

What is even better is not to have to create yet a new username and password for yet another website. That is where ScreenJelly differs from ScreenToarter: although ScreenJelly works pretty much in the same way, you can simply login with your Twitter account… Well, if you don’t have a Twitter account yet, go get one and play with it at least to know what the hype is about…

ScreenCastle is another simple, one-button, Java-based screen recorder that works with not need for complicated software installation. It is based on Skoffer, which offer a useful option for the bloggers out there: if you are an advanced (well, somewhat advanced) user, you can use their API to build plug it into your existing website for even quicker recordings.

Best of all, these tools are free of charge (as of this writing).

ScreenToaster

Screen Jelly

ScreenCastle

(Free) Online Storage and Drives


For those who need to save their files and share them on the cloud. Here is a list of free websites that offer online storage (some can sync our files across multiple computer without the need for individual downloads and uploads):

Box - Free 1GB storage, 5 collaborators and a limit of 25MB per file upload.

DropBox - Free 2GB storage, offers sync’ing.

ADrive – Free 50GB storage, simple storage and sharing capabilities, ability to edit documents online.

ZumoDrive – 1GB free storage, sync’ing, iPhone application.

MediaFire - Free and unlimited file storage, limit of 100MB per upload, upload different files to different folders and share them.

eSnips – Share files with people of the same interests, Youtube and Delicious meet files storage.

 

There are many more services to explore, but these are just a few that stand out to me. You can find more by simply going to a website like Go2Web20 and looking for the tag “storage”.

 

Have your own suggestions, please share them here. 

 

I am also interested in the use of file storage services like these in learning contexts (at school, at work, when designing instruction, etc.), besides the obvious: there is no excuse for forgetting a document anymore and the ease to share any type of file with colleagues, classmates and instructors…

Online File Storage is Evolving – Store, Use, Share Your Media Everywhere


I am a huge fan of having access to my files anywhere, anytime. On a friend’s computer, at home, on my mobile device (the iPhone), etc. Securely, of course…

I have written about file storage and sync’ing before, a lot of them are freemium (you need to pay for extra storage, more features, etc.). A few I’ve found have unlimited storage, like MediaFire.

Sometimes file storage is not enough, we need file editing capabilities on the go. Well, there is Google Docs. Zoho suite, Adobe Buzzword and many other collaborative editing tools out there.

Also, having a neat little Webtop (desktop on the cloud) can be an interesting concept as well and it is evolving little by little.

EyeOS and Cloudo seem to be the most evolved of those competing in this space.

Watch out for Tonido as well, especially for those scared of putting their files out there on a server controlled by other people, well, Tonido lets you easily share files from your computer with not need for uploads… basically unlimited storage (for as long as there is space on your hard drive)… not WebOS, but pretty close and might actually work better than “desktops on the cloud” for now.

Mygazine a Great Compilation of Magazines


Mygazines is an online, simple yet comprehensive magazine archive. User upload, share, bookmark, send via email, comment on and, of course, read articles from magazines from all over the world. All this is a very sleek interface. First the user logs in and searches for a magazine they want to read, then they click on “read” and the magazine pops up on the screen in form of an elegant and feature-rich “flipbook”. The quality of the material is fantastic! Users can also use their keyboard arrows to browse through the pages of the flipbook.

Here are some of the features of the flipbooks (more info on their “flipbook help” page):

Just like anywhere on mygazines.com, from any page in the flipbook you can:

 rate an article (you must be logged in)
 comment on an article (you must be logged in)
 save an article to a mygazine collection (you must be logged in)
 share with friends (you must be logged in)
 social bookmark to your favorite site
 email an article to your friend
 tag article with unique keywords (you must be logged in and have permission)

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